2. Look
Title: Meaning?
Number of Lines:
Number of Stanzas:
Rhyme Pattern: (ABAB, etc)
Type of rhyme pattern? Sonnet, ballad, free verse, blank verse, haiku, etc.
3. Listen
Underline and label with letters below.
a) Enjambed lines?
b) End stopped lines?
c) Alliteration?
d) Assonance?
e) Consonance?
f) Internal rhyme?
g) Slant rhyme?
h) Regular rhythm?
6. Imagery
Identify with highlight
Identify sense(s): Sight, Taste, Smell, Touch, Hearing
7. Figurative meaning, line by line
1. Poem
Title:
Author:
Genre:
4. Literal meaning,
Express the literal meaning line by line. Write to the right of the poem.
5 Figures of Speech
Underline and label as: Simile, Metaphor, Personification
8. Word Choice: Powerful language, unique word choice? Ironic use of words?
9. Theme(s)
10. Quality of poem? 4,3,2,1:
Why? Universality? Unique statement? Powerful images, language, figures of speech?
11. How does each element add to the meaning of the poem? Some elements may be absent; one or two may make the primary impact of the poem. Generally look at each element again and summarize in a phrase.

Title:
Shape, stanzas, rhyme pattern:
Sound and sense:
What is actually happening?
Imagery:
Figurative language:
Word choice:
Theme:
Universal? Unique?


2. Look
Title: Meaning? Just as the color gold is temporary in nature, golden times are temporary.
Number of Lines: 8
Number of Stanzas: 2
Rhyme Pattern: (ABAB, etc) AABB CC DD
Type of rhyme pattern? Sonnet, ballad, free verse, blank verse, haiku, etc.
3. Listen
Underline and label with letters below.
a) Enjambed lines? None
b) End stopped lines? All
c) Alliteration?
d) Assonance?
e) Consonance?
f) Internal rhyme?
g) Slant rhyme?
h) Regular rhythm?
6. Imagery
Identify with underline and lable
Identify sense(s): Sight, Taste, Smell, Touch, Hearing
Sight: colors: green/gold
Flora: leaf and flower,
Sinking: leaf giving in to become not a flower, but a leaf
Eden sinks to grief
Dawn “sinks” to become day
Sinking becomes a disappointment a lower form

7. Figurative meaning, line by line

Just as plants begin in a “golden” way and begin to bloom with flowers,

So, leafs become just leafs.
In the same way, paradise was lost,
The beauty of sunrise becomes the ordinary day,
Beauty and paradise are momentary and transient.

…. And yet growth in nature, and the reality of the day, and even the expulsion from paradise resulted in greater opportunities for growth of nature and mankind.

1. Poem
Title: Nothing Gold Can Stay
Author: Robert Frost
Genre: lyrical poem
Nothing Gold Can Stay
Nature's first green is gold sight
Her hardest hue to
hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
sight
But only so an hour.

Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day. Sight:
descent
Nothing gold can stay.

4. Literal meaning,
Express the literal meaning line by line. Write to the right of the poem.

Golden color and golden times are transient.
The first color of a plant is yellow/gold.
That color does not last long in nature.
The first buds look more like flowers than leaves.
But only for a short period of time

Then those once-flower leaves become plain old leaves.
Just as the paradise of Eden ended in the grief of Adam and Eve being expelled from the Garden.
Just as the beauty of dawn becomes the everyday color, of day.
Thus, in nature and in experience, perfect moments are only temporary.

5 Figures of Speech
Underline and label as: Simile, Metaphor, Personification
Simile/paradox: first green is gold
Early leaf is a flower
Dawn goes down to day

8. Word Choice: Powerful language, unique word choice? Ironic use of words?
subsides” captures the sense of loss as that once-flower-leaf becomes a regular leaf
goes down” is paradoxical since the sun is moving upward and yet the emotion that one feels is one of loss of beauty.

9. Theme(s)
Loss of beauty
Loss of perfection and Paradise
Transience of perfect moments
10. Quality of poem? 4,3,2,1:
Why? Universality? Unique statement? Powerful images, language, figures of speech?
It is a surprise to realize that what we think of as green begins as gold.
It is a short and intense poem.
11. So what?
I would have students read some analyses, for example:
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/frost/gold.htm
p://englishcompanion.ning.com/photo/where-im-from-2?context=latest==Icebreaker/Poetry Introduction==

Where I'm From

by George Ella Lyon
I am from clothespins, from Clorox and carbon-tetrachloride.
I am from the dirt under the back porch.
(Black, glistening,
it tasted like beets.)
I am from the forsythia bush
the Dutch elm
whose long-gone limbs I remember
as if they were my own.
I'm from fudge and eyeglasses,
from Imogene and Alafair.
I'm from the know-it-alls
and the pass-it-ons,
from Perk up! and Pipe down!
I'm from He restoreth my soul
with a cottonball lamb
and ten verses I can say myself.
I'm from Artemus and Billie's Branch,
fried corn and strong coffee.
From the finger my grandfather lost
to the auger,
the eye my father shut to keep his sight.
Under my bed was a dress box
spilling old pictures,
a sift of lost faces
to drift beneath my dreams.
I am from those moments--
snapped before I budded --
leaf-fall from the family tree.

Where Are You From?

"If you don't know where you're from, you'll have a hard time saying where you're going." Wendell Berry, among others, has voiced this idea that we need to understand our roots to know our place in the world. A poem by George Ella Lyon is called "Where I'm From." I first heard it read by Appalachian poet Rita Quillen. Six months later, we used it as a writing assignment in a class taught by my friend Elizabeth Hunter at the Campbell Folk School in North Carolina. The poem lends itself to imitation and makes a wonderful exercise of exploration in belonging.
I'd like to suggest that you give it a try. The prompts have a way of drawing out memories of the smells of attics and bottom-drawer keepsakes; the faces of long-departed kin, the sound of their voices you still hold some deep place in memory. You'll be surprised that, when you're done, you will have said things about the sources of your unique you-ness that you'd never considered before. What's more, you will have created something of yourself to share--with your children, spouse, siblings--that will be very unique, very personal and a very special gift.


The WHERE I'M FROM Template

I am from _ (specific ordinary item), from _ (product name) and _.
I am from the
_ (home description... adjective, adjective, sensory detail).
I am from the _ (plant, flower, natural item), the _ (plant, flower, natural detail)
I am from _ (family tradition) and _ (family trait), from _ (name of family member) and _ (another family name) and _ (family name).
I am from the
_ (description of family tendency) and _ (another one).
From
_ (something you were told as a child) and _ (another).
I am from (representation of religion, or lack of it). Further description.
I'm from
_ (place of birth and family ancestry), _ (two food items representing your family).
From the
_ (specific family story about a specific person and detail), the _ (another detail, and the _ (another detail about another family member).
I am from ___ (location of family pictures, mementos, archives and several more lines indicating their worth).


Where I’m From ~ Fred First ~ November 2003
I am from the peaceful banks of a creek with no name; from JFG, toast and blackberry jam and home-made granola.

I am from "a house with double porches," a room filled with good ghosts and creek laughter in the mornings before first light.

I am from Liriodendron and Lindera, butterfly bush and mountain boomers

I am from Dillons and Harrisons, Betty Jean and Granny Bea-- frugal and long-lived, stubborn and tender, quick to laugh. Or cry.

I am from a world whose geography my children know better than I, from a quiet valley where I am the proprietor and world authority of its small wonders.

From barn loft secret passwords and children who can fly if they only try.

I am from oven-baked Saran Wrap and colds caught from jackets worn indoors.

I am from pire in the blood Baptists, from the cathedral made without hands, the church in the wildwoods, the covenant of grace.

I'm from the Heart of Dixie, son of Scarlett O'hara. From War Eagle, Wiffle, UAB and PT, from Walnut Knob's blue ridge and the soft shadows of Goose Creek.

From a "fast hideous" dresser and a home body from Woodlawn, from a grandfather I never knew that I can blame for my love of nature and my stubbornness, they tell me.

I am from fragments, the faint smell of wood smoke, and familiar walks among trees I know by name, from HeresHome and good stock. A man can hardly ask to be from more.