I. Concerns:
Include: Status of final performance-based assessment (GRASPS)
Include: Status of sequence (6-Facets and WHERETO)
Include: Web 2.0 tool or tools: How is that working? Is it going to facilitate learning?

II. What is going well? I like the way the unit is shaping up.

III. Next steps: What do you need? At the moment I am pretty much set. I do need 20 or 30 feet of VGA cord if anyone has one


X Milestone 3 checklist filled out with questions and concerns

X Annotated bibliography of all resources: print, on line, and expert “interview”
X Technology integration plan is complete
X Results: UbD Stage I questions 1-9 completed, refined
X Assessment: UbD Stage II questions 1-5 plus rubric drafted


I. Questions and Concerns: I've decided to target my unit a bit more specifically. I felt the previous plan wasn't as unified as I wanted. Last year, the students' presentations often were less focused on intolerance as something that shapes people as they were family and friends. I think I have tightened up this hole a bit by making the title more specific as well as creating an entirely different project to demonstrate understanding. I very much wanted to add multi-genre and an on-line connection, but NOT unless they fit very usefully into the goals. I think this draft is closer to what I want.


II. Annotated bibliography of all resources including expert interview (which may be from a social network or a blog).

ADL: Fighting Anti-Semitism, Bigotry and Extremism. Web. 18 Aug. 2010. <http://www.adl.org/>. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) fights anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry in the U.S. and abroad through information, education, legislation, and advocacy, and serves as a resource for government, media, law enforcement, educators, and the public. Very detailed, international, and current.
Bullard, Sara. Teaching Tolerance: Raising Open-minded, Empathetic Children. New York: Doubleday, 1996. Print. Bullard is the director of Teaching Tolerance, the education division of the Southern Poverty Law Center. In her book she studies the roots of our intolerance and states the principles of tolerance adults need to impart to children. A list of resources can be found in the appendix
Naidoo, Beverley. "Out of Bounds." McDougal Littell Literature. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2008. 784-96. Print. An engaging short story about the unlikely relationship between two boys from different social classes in South Africa during apartheid.
Poem Hunter, Web. http://www.poemhunter.com. A database of poetry indexed by subject or author. Primarily non-professional writers.
Putz, Melinda. A Teacher's Guide to the Multigenre Research Project Everything You Need to Get Started. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2006. Print.Step-by-step planning for multi-genre research projects with techniques and methods for evaluation. Handouts as well.
Teaching Tolerance. Web. 21 July 2010. <http://www.tolerance.org/>.This website and "Teaching Tolerance" are projects of
The Southern Poverty Law Center,a nonprofit civil rights organization
dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry, and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of society. Website also contains MANY resources for educators.
To Kill a Mockingbird. Dir. Robert Mulligan. Perf. Gregory Peck. Universal, 1962. DVD. Award-winning film interpretation of Harper Lee's American classic about the frightening power of prejudice, the importance of integrity and fairness. 1996. Print.
Youth for Human Rights. Web. Youth for Human Rights International. August 2010. www.youthforhumanrights
.org>The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights,specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. This website includes videos on each of the Universal Human Rights, as well as curriculum assistance and free educational materials. AWESOME SITE.
"World Wise Schools | Teaching About Culture | Culture Matters Workbook." Peace Corps. Web. 21 July 2010.
<http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/educators/enrichment/culturematters/index.html>.
Teachers and students in classrooms from 8th grade to college can benefit from the cross-cultural training workbook,
Culture Matters, specifically developed by the Peace Corps to help new Volunteers acquire the knowledge and skills to
work successfully and respectfully in other cultures.

III. Technology integration plan
I am already integrating GoogleAps into all my planning this year.
I've set my classroom up differently this year so I can dedicate my class lap-top to a projector. I'm getting (I hope)
all the cables, extensions, etc. I need ready before school starts so I can have it conveniently available whenever
I wish to use a video, text, or show student work.
I will be posting links for forms and checklists on Mrs. Blakeney's Class webpage along with passing our hard copies.
Students will be sending me weekly updates of their work on-line


IV: Stage 1 - Unit so far with studentschecklists (which are actually the same as the evaluation rubrics)

21st Century Teaching in ELA

A Year-End Culminating Project (DRAFT ) Linda Blakeney
What Shapes Who We Are: How Can Intolerance and Prejudice Affect Lives?
Students will explore the concepts of intolerance and prejudice and their effects on the lives of both individuals and groups. They will read about actual and fictional conflicts centering around intolerance and prejudice to discover common underlying attitudes and behaviors. They will make connections between situations and reflect on how these qualities can shape who someone becomes. They will share and expand on connections through a collaborative classroom "blog," and track their progress in an online format (both through GoogleAps). Their final project will be a multi-genre presentation from the point-of-view of one of the characters they discovered in their reading. Additional historical research is encouraged in support of the final project. Projects may be presented on-line, in-hand, or as a mixture of both.

This unit is also the culminating unit of the eighth grade year. Its final project, therefore, serves multiple purposes. Primarily it is intended to demonstrate each student's ability to analyze, synthesize, reflect, create, critique, and present information from multiple sources in a personalized and unique way. Also, it requires students to integrate those thinking skills with the writing skills they've been developing throughout the year in a variety of formats. Finally, and probably most importantly, it serves to introduces students to the effects of unchecked intolerance, and provides them with the opportunity to discover its roots and ways to prevent its spread.
What overarching understandings are desired?
  • It is a common human trait to resist change to one's ideas of what is "normal" and "right.
  • The concepts of "normal" and "right" that become ours have been shaped by our environment.
  • People tend to fear what they don't understand, and the consequences of that fear can be life and culture threatening.
  • Tolerance of diversity is essential to the success of both the individual and our country in the 21st century world economy.

What are the overarching "essential" questions?
  • How do people develop personal beliefs and values?
  • How can a person's personal beliefs and attitudes affect the lives of others in the larger community?
  • What might cause a person to re-evaluate their attitude towards themselves or others?


What will students know as a result of this unit?
  • Who we become and the choices we make are shaped and influenced from birth by many outside factors.
  • .Our exercise of our personal values can affect others either positively or negatively.
  • We must question and confront attitudes and behaviors that deny others their essential human rights to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."

What will the students be able to do as a result of this unit?
  • Students will be able to recognize intolerant statements and behaviors.
  • Students will be able to choose to avoid engaging in intolerant behaviors, and will discourage them in others.
  • Students will act in a tolerant manner towards those different than themselves.



Grade 8 - Final Project - 4 weeks STUDENT HANDOUT Mrs. Blakeney May/June 2011
What Shapes Who We Become: How Can Intolerance and Prejudice Affect Lives?

You will be reading two shorter non-fiction pieces and a novel of your choice as the background for exploring this essential question. You may find you wish to do additional research about a time period or culture for your final project as well.
Ongoing work includes:
  1. Two Connections reading/writing guides that will be completed after you've done your reading and then passed-in with Project Part I
  2. A processing journal on Google Aps, updated weekly (link on Mrs. B's ELA WebPage - Google Sites for blank copy
  3. Participating in the class "Blog" on Google Aps at least three times.
You will be introduced to a variety of writing styles in the form of mini-lessons during the unit in preparation for your final project. Questions or difficulties that surface through the class "Blog" may also be addressed in class. Otherwise, you will be reading, writing, and researching during class time.
Your final project will demonstrate what you have learned about the unit question from your readings, blog discussions, and research. There are two parts, and each will be assessed separately.
I . Final Project Part I: THE REFLECTIVE LETTER (Letter format, MLA style)
Write a letter to me in which you briefly describe the three pieces you've read. Next, discuss what connected two or three of the pieces in relation to the unit question. Focus on the values and how people came to believe as they did. Also reflect on the outcome of their intolerant acts on others. Add your own personal reflections on anything else that you found particularly interesting or important to you. This Reflective Letter is worth one test grade.
II . Final Project Part II: THE PROJECT (On-line or in-hand or both)
Choose one character from your readings for this unit, and create either a time capsule (shoebox, jewelry box, small chest containing papers, for example) or a scrapbook that tells about a critical time in his or her life. These projects will be displayed and/or presented to the class.
Requirements:
Must include at least 1,000 words
Must use at least five different types of writing
Each piece of writing must present new information
Your choices demonstrate understanding of the essential question.


STUDENT SELF-MONITORING CHECKLIST (keep in your notebook or use in GoogleAps)
Check when you have completed each of these unit elements. When you've checked them all, you're ready to make your presentation.
  • I read two non-fiction pieces from "Us and Them: The History of Intolerance in America" of my choice. I took reading notes as needed.
  • I read a novel of my choice where the conflict involved intolerance or prejudice and took placein the United States. I took reading notes as needed.
  • I participated on the Class Blog at least three times
  • I recorded my progress weekly on-line
  • I thoughtfully completed the Making Connections 1 organizer after completing my reading.
  • I thoughtfully completed the Making Connections II organizer after the first organizer.
  • I wrote my Reflective Letter to Mrs. Blakeney, and typed in letter format using MLA style. I carefully proofread for mechanics and accuracy.
  • I passed in my Reflective Letter along with the two Making Connections organizers.
  • I completed my Project and it meets the following requirements;
  • 1,000 words or more
  • Five different genres of writing
  • Each genre presents new and relevant information
  • The pieces I created and the information present demonstrates my undesrtanding of the big question : How Can Intolerance and Prejudice Affect Lives?
  • I am ready to present my Project to class either on-line or in-hand.




What Shapes Who We Become: How Can Intolerance and Prejudice Affect Lives?
EVALUATION CRITERIA
Two quiz grades:
One for thoughtful and relevant on-line blog participation
One for completing weekly processing journal notes
Reflective Letter Test Grade based on:
  • All required work passed in
  • All directions followed completely
  • Letter has been carefully proofread for mechanics and content.
  • Letter demonstrates understanding of unit content and question
  • Letter demonstrates student's ability to reflect
Project Test Grade based on:
  • Includes at least 1,000 words
  • Includes at least five different writing styles
  • Written pieces demonstrate student understanding of genre style and purpose
  • Written pieces each feature new/different information
  • Information included is well-chosen and relevant
  • Project presentation is clear and well-organized
  • Project has been carefully proofread for mechanics and content.
  • Project shows creativity/effortroject demonstrates understanding of unit question


Presentations will begin on (Date) and continue through (dates). Sign up sheet is posted in class if you have a day preference. If you already know you will NOT be in class on one of these days, be sure to reserve a space on a day when you will.






STUDENT HANDOUT
MAKING CONNECTIONS I
Articles and Book(s) I've read


Things I've noticed that people have in common.

Things I've noticed that situations have in common

Things I've noticed that outcomes have in common

Dfferences I've noticed between the people, situations, and outcomes in the three readings.

Generalizations I can make from my reading


KEEP THIS SHEET IN YOUR BINDER. YOU WILL BE HANDING IT IN WITH YOUR PROJECT



STUDENT HANDOUT
MAKING CONNECTIONS 2
How do my readings relate to our Unit Questions?


What Shapes Who We Are? CAN intolerance and prejudice affect lives?


Where Do We Get Our Values?


How Do We Know What's Right?

KEEP THIS SHEET IN YOUR BINDER. YOU WILL BE HANDING IT IN WITH YOUR PROJECT.




Stage 2

Determine Acceptable Evidence
1. Culminating Performance Task or Project (see above)
2. What other academic evidence will you use? (see above)
3. Rubric to assess Performance Task: The rubric will look like the criteria the students have already received. It will be in a similar checklist format and 100- point based (as my final grades need to be)

4. Advanced - Student meets all criteria at the highest level/concept understanding above age-level

3. Proficient Student meets all criteria and demonstrates age-appropriate concept understanding

2. Needs Improvement Students hasn't met all criteria, yet shows some concept understanding

1. Serious misunderstandings Student work shows lack of concept understanding


4. Other Evidence (e.g. observations, work samples, dialogues). Describe briefly or attach document.
Throughout the course of this unit, my job will be to teach all-class mini-lessons on areas everyone needs instruction in (such as the criteria for varied genres of writing) as well as engage in small group and individual instruction on topics that come-up as I observe their class work, blogs, and on-line progress reports. Through my interactions with individual students I will be able to track individual progress, perhaps on a checklist - I'm still thinking about this one.

5. Student Self-Assessment (see Unit Plan)
Milestone II Template and Checklist - Linda Blakeney July 21, 2010

qx Milestone 2 checklist filled out with questions/concerns
qx
Problem/theme more clearly defined in UbD document
qx
UbD Stage I Results: questions 1-9 drafted
qx
Annotated bibliography of initial research for expert and print
qx
Annotated bibliography of initial on-line resources (Create at least one full annotation for one source)
qx
Plan for technology integration
qx
Collaborative presentation outline


I. Questions or concerns: Not at this time.

II.
Stage 1 Understanding by Design Identify Desired Results

1. Names of Participant(s): Linda Blakeney

2. Grade Level: 8

3. Course or Unit Tolerance: Where Do We Stand?

4. Course/Unit Description:

Students will explore the concept of tolerance. They will read/view actual and fictional instances of intolerance, discover common underlying behaviors/attitudes that produce them, reflect on their own beliefs, and collaborate to propose ways to build tolerance now and in the future.

6. What overarching understandings are desired?


Although change is inevitable in life, most human beings resist change to their familar way of life.

Human beings tend to fear what they don't understand, and the consequences of that fear can be life and culture threatening.

Understanding of differences and similarities can lead to tolerance.

Tolerance of diversity is essential to the success of a democratic society such as the US.


7. What are the overarching "essential" questions?

How do we get our values and beliefs?
How does culture shape and limit our beliefs and action?
Where does prejudice and bias come from?
What must we accept, and what should we question in our lives?

8. What will students know as a result of this unit?


Our values begin in our families.
As we grow our culture (our friends, religion, church, country, and the media we are exposed to) will also shape our beliefs.
What is right is what YOU as a human being would wish to be treated like in a similar situation. The "golden rule " reaches across cultures and time.
We should question statements and behaviors that deny a person their essential rights to "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness."


9. What will the students be able to do as a result of this unit?


Students will recognize intolerant statements and behaviors.
Students will choose to avoid engaging in intolerant behaviors, and will discourage them in others.
Students will act in a tolerant manner towards those different than themselves.


III. Annotated bibliography: For resources and examples see:

Works Cited

Bullard, Sara. Teaching Tolerance: Raising Open-minded, Empathetic Children. New York: Doubleday, 1996. Print. Bullard, director of Teaching Tolerance, the education division of the Southern Poverty Law Center, has written a powerful book for parents, educators, and anyone else who seeks to understand his or her own attitudes toward others. She studies the roots of our intolerance, which she sees as rising from our natural self-centeredness and our learning to cope with others. Each chapter includes suggestions for activities and journal entries in which readers can identify their own biases and understand their own behavior. Bullard explicitly states the principles of tolerance adults need to impart to children and provides guidelines for modeling the behavior we want to encourage. A list of resources can be found in the appendix
Naidoo, Beverley. "Out of Bounds." McDougal Littell Literature. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2008. 784-96. Print. A short story about the unlikely relationship between two boys from different social classes in South Africa during apartheid.
Teaching Tolerance. Web. 21 July 2010. <http://www.tolerance.org/>. This website and "Teaching Tolerance" are projects of The Southern Poverty Law Center,a nonprofit civil rights organization dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry, and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of society. Website also contains MANY resources for educators.
To Kill a Mockingbird. Dir. Robert Mulligan. Perf. Gregory Peck. Universal, 1962. DVD. Award- winning film interpretation of Harper Lee's American classic about the frightening power of prejudice and the importance of integrity and fairness. 1996. Print.
Teaching Tolerance. Web. 21 July 2010. <http://www.tolerance.org/>.This website and "Teaching Tolerance" are projects of The Southern Poverty Law Center,a nonprofit civil rights organization dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry, and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of society. Website also contains MANY resources for educators.

"World Wise Schools | Teaching About Culture | Culture Matters Workbook." Peace Corps. Web. 21
July 2010. <http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/educators/enrichment/culturematters/index.html>.
Teachers and students in classrooms from 8th grade to college can benefit from the cross- cultural training workbook, Culture Matters, specifically developed by the Peace Corps to help new Volunteers acquire the knowledge and skills to work successfully and respectfully in other cultures.


V. What new technology or new adaptation to technology do you intend to integrate into your classroom teaching next year. How will you use it?
I plan to add Google.Apps as a method for students to work collaboratively on projects in this unit, as well as to type and submit work to me. I also expect to add other resources as I become aware or them in my next classes.

VI. Describe the progress that you have made in your collaborative presentation.
I haven't focused on this part of the project yet, because I am reworking this unit on my own.