I. Concerns (August):
Include: Status of final performance-based assessment (GRASPS)

At this point, we feel as though our product reaches all the indicators within the GRASPS.

Include: Status of sequence (6-Facets and WHERETO)

We also feel as though our product/assessment as well as the formative assessments will bring the students to the 6 facets of understanding and WHERETO. We will still continue to develop and examine more assessment activities to bring our students to the same goal, coming from two different classrooms

Include: Web 2.0 tool or tools: How is that working? Is it going to facilitate learning?

We feel as though using Google Apps will be incredibly helpful to facilitate learning, we will use it directly in our classroom and use it for peer editing.

II. What is going well?

Interdisciplinary planning is going great!

III. Next steps: What do you need?

More time, to work on our presentation to the class.


These are the sites Olga and I are sharing with the class on 8/19:
Burg, Jerome. "Candide by Voltaire." Google Lit Trips. 1 Dec. 2006. Web. 17, Aug. 2010. < http://www.googlelittrips.com>
This is an excellent website for teachers. You must download google earth first. Teachers and professors chose literary pieces and via google earth, and create a travel itinerary of all the places that are mentioned in a the work. The audience is able to travel with the characters to see where they stayed and where they lived first-hand. At each location, the audience can zoom in and see the landscape. In addition, there is a tab to click on and you are provided with information about each locale. Students get to see that the places our characters travel to can be inspired by actual locations. It helps them understand the work better and also relate to the characters better. They might get inspired themselves and decide to someday see the places in person.

  • Sanders, Michael. "Natural Rights and Giving Them Up." Academic Earth. Harvard University. Web. 16 Aug. 2010
http://www.academicearth.org/lectures/natural-rights-and-giving-them-up
This source is primarily for the teacher although it is up to his/her discretion to decide if students can sit through an entire lecture. You will find recorded lectures of actual professors at Harvard University and Yale University. These recorded lectures are part of an actual course and are in a series. Each site contains a brief description of each part of the lecture, and the topics that the professor will be discussing. There are also two links to discussion questions ranging between advanced questions and moderate where the teacher can decide which questions he/she would like to use in the classroom to help students stay focused. This site is extremely helpful in getting in depth background
  • http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook.html - This is an awesome site!! For any history teacher! This site is Modern History Sourcebook, however it will also do medieval history and ancient history. This site is great for all teachers who discuss anything about history, all over the world! What I also like about his source is that it focus is primary sources, from text to images to music. Really cool. As an aide for those new to primary sources, there is a link devoted to why/how to use primary sources and how they differ from secondary sources. For this project I have found this site helpful, but now that I have utilized it for this I know I will definitely be referring to it for other units.



Kate and Olga – Annotated Bibliography


· Abrams, M.H.ed. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Sixth ed. Vol 1. New York: W.W. Norton &Company, 1993. Print.

This anthology is the primary source for the English teacher to introduce students to the variety of works studied in the Seventeenth Century of British Literature. The selected works from this edition make it possible for the teacher to focus on specific texts in their political, cultural, and literary contexts. It is helpful for teachers to familiarize themselves with the informative introduction of the time period prior to beginning the unit. The print size of
he pages might not allow for easy readability to students therefore a "student edition" anthology might be needed. A goal COULD be to develop a student-friendly anthology with student notations for the next year's class.

Burg, Jerome. "Candide by Voltaire." Google Lit Trips. 1 Dec. 2006. Web. 17, Aug. 2010. < http://www.googlelittrips.com>
This is an excellent website for teachers. You must download google earth first. Teachers and professors chose literary pieces and via google earth, and create a travel itinerary of all the places that are mentioned in a the work. The audience is able to travel with the characters to see where they stayed and where they lived first-hand. At each location, the audience can zoom in and see the landscape. In addition, there is a tab to click on and you are provided with information about each locale. Students get to see that the places our characters travel to can be inspired by actual locations. It helps them understand the work better and also relate to the characters better. They might get inspired themselves and decide to someday see the places in person.

* Lynch, Jack. "Eighteenth Century Resources-Literature." Eighteenth Century Resources-Literature. Rutgers University, 7 Jan. 2006. Web 18 Aug. 2010. http://ethnicity.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/18th/history.html

Excellent resource on the Eighteenth Century. Prof. Jack Lynch teaches in the English Department at Rutgers University. This web page is an excellent reference for all literary aspects of the Eighteenth century. There are links to art, poetry, the novel, periodicals, theater and drama, satire, and women writers. For any teacher who would like to have background information on the literature of the time period, this would be the place to start. Prof. Lynch also posts his course descriptions and offers references for extended reading that are very helpful.


· (expert) McLeay,Jo. Web log post. Using Blogs and Wikis in the English Classroom. Jim Burke. Web 5 July, 2010. http://englishcompanion.ning.com



· Rousseau, Jean Jacques. The Social Contract or Principles of Political Right. Sept. 1995. Web July 2010 <http://www.constitution.org/jjr/socon.htm.>
This source is the Social Contract composed by Jean Jacques Rousseau. This is one of the most noted documents from the Enlightened time, written by one of the most noted figures from the Enlightenment. Rousseau paved the way for more Enlightened ideas to follow.
This document is a great source for teachers, however way too extensive and heavy for the students to read on their own. It would beneficial for teachers to identify excerpts that capture Rousseau’s main ideas that support the ideals of the Enlightenment.

· Sebranek, Patrick, Verne Meyer, and Dave Kemper. Writers Inc Write for College A Student Handbook. Wilmington:Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997. Print

This is a great resource for both students and teachers alike. The book identifies five forms of writing as well as eight sections of how to approach a research paper. There is an entire section on Persuasive writing that offers a definition on various forms of persuasion. Each section is accompanied by a number of persuasive topics and sample essays.

· Warriner, John E., Richard M. Ludwig and Francis X. Connolly. Advanced Composition: A Book of Models For Writing. New York:Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. 1961
Print.


Though this edition is outdated, the essays offered on Argument and Persuasion are excellent and timeless. Each sample essay is followed by a complete analysis by the authors. There are also "critical thinking" questions on content and technique for students to respond to. I wonder if students could add to this after they've studied multiple writings by their selected author.

· Hackett, Lewis. The Age of the Enlightenment; The European dream of Progress and Enlightenment. 1992.
Web. June 24, 2010 <http://history-world.org/age_of_enlightenment.htm>.

This is a great site for students and teachers. The author is an expert in the ideas of the Enlightenment, the key figures and the effects it had in Europe. The author breaks the information into easy to read sections based on the areas influenced by the Enlightenment, such as literature, art, philosophy, etc. He then goes into detail with the reaction by various figures, such as the church and governments. This is a great resource for the influence the Enlightenment had and the progress that resulted from it. The author also has links with his expertise on leading figures of the Enlightenment, such as Locke, Rousseau, Deiderot and Voltaire. His original article does also include the works of Pope, Kant, as well as the role of women.

This is going to be a very useful source for the students and teachers to answer the essential and academic questions. Although this is an "expert", I do feel the information to be reliable, due to the fact that the information is not one-sided, it is factual and it is consistent with other sources. I feel this is very helpful to aid in our research and that of the students.

· (expert) Hooker, Richard. The European Enlightenment. 1996. Web. July 7, 2010 <www.wsu.edu/~dee/ENLIGHT/PREPHIL.HTM>

This source will be very helpful for teachers and students alike. The information provided gives insight into the early ideas that sparked the Enlightenment period, as well as a number of writers and philosophs who contributed to the movement. This is an awesome site that gives great detail into the early time period, role of women, specific contributions and ideas of many leading figures. This expert gives a non-bias view of these historical people and contributions and makes relevant connections to today. For example, Rousseau's book Emile gives his ideas on education being for the child/student, to maximize their potential instead of limiting it. This philosophy helped shape the American and British education systems.

This is going to be a very useful source for teachers to gain solid background information as well as anecdotal pieces to make history and words of persuasion relevant for their students. Teachers can also utilize this information to help students see the progress of history and understand the impact along the political, social, and intellectual lines. For students this will be incredibly helpful as they prepare to role-play their figure with clear understanding of what their person stood for and represented. It will also be very helpful to answer the essential questions.


· Voltaire. Candide 1759. Cricket House Books LLC Copyrighted 2010. Print.

This source is an excellent examples for teachers to utilize in the classroom. The content is lengthy and a bit dense for students to get through in a short period of time, therefore teachers would be best off to take excerpts to use in class. For both the teachers and students, the writing of Voltaire offers a satirical view of the discrimination between social classes that existed at the time, along with the inequality in social status and the impact that had on society at the time. It also offers both the belief that "human will is free", but that blind optimism is nonsense and one just can't "wish" for ideal society, you have to create it so to speak.

This is a great example for students to get insight from a person who lived during the time period we are referring to in the Enlightenment. The book/excerpts will be bias, as Voltaire was one of the great philosophs who spoke out against prejudices and inequalities and this book supports his views.



This is an awesome site!! For any history teacher! This site is Modern History Sourcebook, however it will also do medieval history and ancient history. This site is great for all teachers who discuss anything about history, all over the world! What I also like about his source is that it focus is primary sources, from text to images to music. Really cool. As an aide for those new to primary sources, there is a link devoted to why/how to use primary sources and how they differ from secondary sources. For this project I have found this site helpful, but now that I have utilized it for this I know I will definitely be referring to it for other units.
  • Sanders, Michael. "Natural Rights and Giving Them Up." Academic Earth. Harvard University. Web. 16 Aug. 2010
http://www.academicearth.org/lectures/natural-rights-and-giving-them-up
This source is primarily for the teacher although it is up to his/her discretion to decide if students can sit through an entire lecture. You will find recorded lectures of actual
professors at Harvard University and Yale University. These recorded lectures are part of an actual course and are in a series. Each site contains a brief description of each
part of the lecture, and the topics that the professor will be discussing. There are also two links to discussion questions ranging between advanced questions and moderate where the teacher can decide which questions he/she would like to use in the classroom to help students stay focused. This site is extremely helpful in getting in depth background
information on specific topics by experts.


  • Nancy Patierno – History Teacher. North Middlesex Regional High School.

Nancy is a true history teacher, she is incredibly strong in content as well as how to teach history and for that matter how students learn history. I interviewed Nancy and asked her several questions that I felt were relevant to this course and instruction in general. As I have worked with Nancy for many years, she and I have many of the same ideals and beliefs on what it means to be a history teacher and how to get the content to the kids in an engaging and meaningful way.

Question 1:
What are some ways that you would incorporate technology into our Enlightenment unit or other units at that?
- Develop powerpoints or have students develop power points to present information. More though use technology to get to the research that the students don’t have access to in their text. Such as the background history of the time period, what is going on in France at this time for example. Graphics that enhance lesson; costumes worn, again help enhance content; This makes history more appealing to the kids when they can not only hear about history but also see it.

Question 2:
What are some ways that you incorporate 21st century skills into history?
- I think its more about critical thinking than technology, especially if you’re in a place where technology is challenging. My goal is to get kids to analyze then follow with synthesis which is truly a skill that needs to be taught and developed. Then its essential for students to connect how those skills apply to life as well as the history has to become relevant to them. They need to be able to see how all of this can apply outside the classroom

Question 3:
What are some steps/measures you take to ensure your goal of the lesson/unit connects to your end result?
- I always start off with the objective, the daily objective helps to get to the daily goal. I also have an overarching question and objective that I reinforce as I go through the units and lessons. Again the daily objective will help me get there. When doing daily objective, I always assess self and the students at the end of the lesson. At the end of the day, week, etc I need to measure if the students are where I need them to be or want them to be. If they aren’t, I need to back up and see what I missed or wasn’t clear and then follow up on that.

Question 4:
As a history teacher, what are some techniques or things that you do to help your students develop as writers and oral speakers?
- What people often forget is that historians are communicators, so writing in history is essential. We reinforce basic grammar regularly, expect students to write fully and completely. Basic organization is expected too. As for speaking, we often have activities where students speak in front of the class, with that I give them a handout on what makes a good speech and then hold them accountable in the rubric. Some things are preparedness, not reading from a sheet of paper, rehearsing, even following time constraints.
* Nancy also followed that up with a handout she gives to her students AP, Accelerated and College Prep for History Writing, a “do and do not” of sorts.
Interview with Judy Capone English Language Arts Teacher at Stoneham Middleschool
Judy Capone has been teaching English Language Arts at Stoneham Middleschool located in Stoneham, Ma for eight years. She loves her job and loves the age group of
her students. She admits that she has not given herself enough time to "upgrade" her lesson plans so that they align with the demands of technology in the new millenium.
She has worked hard to focus on literacy and fluency but she understands that technology has made a huge impact on the way students see communication today. I
was curious about how her school has helped her to be ready for these new social demands and sat down with her for an interview. Judy is a close friend of mine. We met
during our sophomore semester in college where we both studied abroad in Oxford, England. We bonded because we were both there for the same reason; to see the home
of all our favorite writers, and what better place to study English Literature but England?
Question 1
How successful do you feel you have been in incorporating technology into your teaching?
I don't feel that I have done enough. Our school is pretty big and we don't have enough resources for all our students. But, I have created lessons around the use
of power point. In the past, I have assigned students to partner with one or two other classmates and create a small power point presentation. This is for my 8th graders
only.
Question 2
What is your favorite lesson to teach and how could you incorporate technology into this?
I love introducing my 8th grade students to some of Shakespeare's work. We read A Midsummer Night's Dream. I ask students to recreate the entire play and each
student must audition for the role. I think that I would probably create a "class blog" where each student can share concerns, or gain praise on each day's practice. Perhaps
students from other schools could get in on it and offer their own suggestions if they have completed a similar assignment.
Question 3
In the future, do you feel that you will start planning lessons keeping in mind that technology is key? How can teachers use technology to connect better with their students?
I think for myself, I would like to use technology to better know my students and hopefully for them to understand themselves. I think that the age group that I teach,
students are still trying to figure themselves out and technology is for most students, the primary way they get to express themselves and feel as individuals. I would
improve on my unit where we read autobiographies. I think that's where I would start. I might ask them to create an autobiographical prezi detailing an important
lesson they have learned in their lives.





EXIT SLIP for July Class for group

Concerns - Not a concern, more of a question - do we still teach our curriculum with activities that we do independently then incorporate our collaborative project?

Whatever works, Kate. I'm guessing some of the activities may be shared, some independent, whatever gets you where you are going and that respects your course and Olga's as well as your students.

Needs - Need to get the Prezi to let us sign up/sign in - had trouble last week. Once we get on, we need to play around with all the fun stuff we can do to make a cool project., I just logged into but now we need to take the tutorial in August and play!

Kate, I even cut and pasted an old powerpoint into the prezi and then added words and angles and closeups.

Good Things - Having a great time working collaboratively with Olga. My department is great about collaborating together, but to work with another discipline (excluding World and American Studies) is great - who knew that we did similar content between 9th grade and 12th grade?!

I think it's unique that it's 9th and 12th. That is really unusual.


Kate and Olga: I've found a few unique sites. The first allows you to "pin" photographs on maps. The second describes virtual tours. As you are putting your salon together, take pictures, collect papers and presentations and put them together into a virtual tour. The article has many historical resources including creating virtual field trips, etc. The third is the synopsis of a study that used a listserve to discuss ideas in a "salon" across two colleges.http://www.historypin.com/

Check out history pin for student project. An example of two classes communicating via the Internet. Worth a visit at http://advicethroughetherealwalls.blogspot.com/

How about creating a virtual historical tour or a virtual salon to record what you have done? http://www.thwt.org/virtualtours.htm Examples of Virtual Tours and Electronic Field Trips Excerpt from Best Ideas for Teaching with Technology: A Practical Guide for Teachers, by Teachers . . . Field trips are excellent ways to immerse students in historical evidence by visiting museums, historical sites, author residences, or government buildings. Field trips are also expensive, complicated to organize, and draw students away from their other class responsibilities. Fortunately, if you cannot visit an important site in person, you can often visit the site virtually on the Web. While some online virtual tours consist of static two-dimensional images and text, others contain engaging three-dimensional animations and simulations, panoramic video, and more. Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home and plantation in Charlottesville, Virginia, offers an excellent example of a virtual tour at http://www.monticello.org/. The site offers two major tours of the house and plantation and several more specialized tours related to domestic life and horticulture. Each section of the tour has a Flash animated visit to a different section of the house and plantation, narrated by the Monticello staff. The British Broadcasting Corporation has some excellent online virtual tours.

BBC History tours are available at http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/virtual_tours/ and are divided into three major categories: Ancient History, British History, and World Wars. The tours contain panoramas and 3-D models and several involve historical reconstructions and simulations. The BBC's new Audio and Video service also offers a tour of the trail that links Shakespeare's birthplace of Stratford-on-Avon with the Globe Theatre in London. Virtual Tours are excellent vehicles for bringing primary source materials into the classroom, and museums and historical sites are adding more virtual tours to their Web sites. Some museums have Web sites that are so well-structured, you can just let students loose on them and trust that great learning will take place as students explore. If you expect that your students will need a little more guidance, here are some ways to structure student explorations of these tours.

  • Build a Scavenger Hunt around a virtual tour or a specific museum collection, like this one below
  • Give students an essay question or a series of short answer questions to be answered after taking the virtual tour.
  • Have students design their own guided tour of a museum collection organized around a theme, like Egyptian Objects for the Dead or Early American Objects for the Home. Students could post links and their own descriptions on a blog or Word document.
  • For an advanced class, use a screen recording program (see Chapter 8, Student Presentations) to have teams of students record their own guided visit to a museum collection or virtual site.
TechTrekers Virtual Field Trips
Excellent for incorporating multiculturalism into the classroom. Through this site teachers can encourage their students to travel virtually to many countries. This site consists primarily of links to numerous virtual field trips as well as teaching projects, strategies and resources used by teachers around the world.
British Museum Tours
Tours include: The African Galleries; The 'Caves of the Thousand Buddhas'; Changing Face: Masks from the British Museum; Chinese Jade; Cleopatra of Egypt: from History to Myth; D�rer and his Legacy; Egypt in the Old Kingdom; Gladiators and Caesars; Human Image; A Kind of Magic; Our Top Ten British Treasures; Rembrandt the Printmaker; Science and the Past; and The Vikings
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
There is much quality material for art students, educators, and enthusiasts at the The Metropolitan Museum of Art web site. Start with the Metropolitan Museum of Art Timeline of Art History, a chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of the history of art from around the world. Each timeline page includes representative art from the Museum's collection, a chart of time periods, a map of the region, an overview, and a list of key events. The timelines- accompanied by world, regional, and sub-regional maps-provide a linear outline of art history, and allow visitors to compare and contrast art from around the globe at any time in history. There is plenty more here apart from the Timeline: "Just for Fun" has interactive activities for kids, "A Closer Look" examines the "hows and whys" behind Met objects (such as George Washington Crossing the Delaware), "Artist" enables visitors to access biographical materials on a selection of artists as well as general information about their work, and "Themes and Cultures" presents past and present cultures with special features on the Met's collections and exhibitions.
BBC History Virtual Tours
'Walk' around a historical building or structure take a 3D tour of a famous site in British History. You can embark on a Viking Quest, see how an Iron Age roundhouse was built, or take a virtual tour of a World War One trench.
Smithsonian American Art Museum
The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) is America's first federal art collection, dedicated to the art and artists of the United States. More than 7,000 American artists are represented, including major artists such as John Singleton Copley, John Singer Sargent, Georgia O'Keeffe, and others. Themes and topics include Colonial portraiture, nineteenth-century landscape, American impressionism, twentieth-century realism and abstraction, New Deal projects, sculpture, photography, prints and drawings, contemporary crafts, African American art, Latino art, and folk art are featured in the collection. Today the collection consists of more than 40,000 artworks in all media, spanning more than 300 years of artistic achievement. The Smithsonian Online Exhibitions feature prize holdings from different eras in American history. The online version of American Art, the academic journal of the Smithsonian American Art Museum has articles of interest to art historians.
Oriental Institute Virtual Museum
The Oriental Institute Museum is a showcase of the history, art and archaeology of the ancient Near East. The Museum exhibits major collections of antiquities from Egypt, Mesopotamia, Iran, Syria, Palestine, and Anatolia. The Oriental Institute Virtual Museum makes use of a series of Apple QuickTime VR panoramic movies to take you on an tour of each of the Museum's galleries, accompanied by descriptions of each alcove and their artifacts. Where appropriate, links to related materials, such as the Museum's Highlights From The Collections, the Photographic Archives, and relevant Oriental Institute Archaeology and Philology projects elaborate on the most significant objects in greater detail.
U.S. History.org
The Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia has produced this fun and engaging site where you can enjoy a virtual tour of Philadelphia and visit Betsy Ross' House. You can also learn why Pennsylvania is misspelled on the bell and the story of the crack. Electric Franklin provides resources for you to explore the diversity that was Benjamin Franklin and there are several section that deal with the revolutionary war.
Pilgrim Hall Museum
Through its exhibition of Pilgrim possessions and Native American artifacts, Pilgrim Hall tells the stories of America's founding and traditions. The museum features an online tour of artifacts owned by Pilgrims. Tour the PILGRIM STORY, which combines artifacts with historical information to illuminate the Pilgrim and Native American story to 1692, when Plymouth Colony as an independent entity came to an end.Beyond the Pilgrim Story gives additional information about particular aspects of the Pilgrim story that have been of interest to visitors.
Turning the Pages
Turning the Pages enables visitors to virtually "turn" the pages of manuscripts using touch-screen technology and animation.
Historical Tour of the White House
Britannia Virtual Tours
Britannia's Virtual Tours will take you to some of the most interesting places in England and Wales and in the process help you to gain a better understanding of an area, its famous people, its landmarks and its history.
Vatican Museums, Vatican City
This site offers online tours of the collections of art and antiquities at the Vatican museums. Collections include the Gregorian Egyptian and Etruscan Museums, Raphael's Rooms, the Pinacoteca (Art Gallery), and the Ethnological Missionary Museum. Visitors can examiner various rooms in the Vatican, including the Sistine Chapel. Visitors may also take a virtual tour of each room.
Mr. Dowling's Electronic Passport
Mr. Dowling's Electronic Passport helps kids browse the world in his virtual classroom. He introduces you to many civilizations with clear explanations, engaging graphics for kids, and "cool links". His study guides, homework assignments and exams are free and available for you to print or to edit.
Forum Romanum
A nineteen year old freshman at Harvard has put together an award-winning site on Ancient Rome that includes a virtual tour, a dictionary of Mythology, a Picture Index, and much information on History, Life, Language, and Literature
Dead Romans
Part of the History Online project, this site features an introduction to Roman coins, a 3D tour with maps and historical background, artwork from the early Roman empire, a timeline of emperors, and links
Virtual Jamestown
The Virtual Jamestown Archive is an on-going digital research, teaching and learning project that explores the legacies of the Jamestown settlement and "the Virginia experiment." There are first-hand accounts and letters, interpretive essays, and more.
Pyramids -- The Inside Story (PBS)
This attractive PBS site provides a nice blend of images and history of the pyramids and offers insights into excavations and mysteries.
Virtual Tour Around a Medieval Town and Village
"You are a fantastic inventor who has created a magnificent TIME MACHINE.
You set the dates for the time of the dinosaurs, but due to a mechanical fault the machine has crash landed in the MIDDLE AGES.
Your task is to find the missing pieces of the time machine which have been scattered around this area.
When you have found all of the missing pieces, you must then get back to the machine to return home.
You should have a worksheet to help you with this."
Enter the Middle Ages
Tramline Virtual Tours with Tour Maker
  • American Presidency (9-12)
  • September 11 and Beyond (8-12)
  • Dark Ages (5-8)
  • Lewis and Clark (4-8)
  • My America (4-7)
  • The Oregon Trail (4-8)
  • Women's History (9-12)
Bringing an Online Museum Exhibit to Classrooms
by Laura C. Lewis
Laura shares her work in creating an on-line exhibit based on the Illinois State Museum exhibit "At Home in the Heartland." The exhibit explores 300 years of family life in Illinois through the personal narratives of men and women who lived in Illinois and through objects from the home across the centuries. Read her article and then visit the site.http://www.techlearning.com/db_area/archives/WCE/archives/lewis.htm
Using the Internet to Take a Field Trip and Encourage Writing
In the third installment of his "Connecting Collaborators" column Frank offers two creative ways for Internet collaborative teaching partners to involve their students. In "Field Trip Exchanges" he offers suggestions on using both words and pictures to share an educational experience. In "Story Starters & Other Writing Ideas" he offers sparkplugs to spur student creativity.



http://crs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/25/1/36

Using Computer Listserves To Achieve a More Diverse Classroom: the "Virtual Salon"

Thomas L. Steiger
Indiana State University
Rhonda F. Levine
Colgate University
Two stratification courses, one at an elite private liberal arts college and another at a regional state university were joined through a listserve or computer mailing list . Students were required to participate in the "virtual salon." The primary goal of the virtual salon was to increase the diversity of students discussing topics common in the courses. The virtual salon was successful in achieving this goal as well as making it a meaningful learning experience by creating passionate engagement in the material, the students shared knowledge, and a sense of community was created where students from diverse backgrounds felt comfortable expressing themselves.


Critical Sociology, Vol. 25, No. 1, 36-58 (1999)
DOI: 10.1177/08969205990250010501