Fitchburg State College
Educator Courses
Semester: Summer II 2010 Year: 2010-11
Course Dates: 6/24/10 - 2/28/11
Location: NMRHS, Townsend, MA
Course Prefix and Number: PDMT 6473
Schedule Number (CRN): 50787
Graduate Credit: 3 graduate credits: 37.5 contact hours.

Course Title: Twenty-First Century Skills in the English Classroom: A Problem-Based Course for Teachers by Teachers

Meeting Times/Locations: Dates/Times: All classes will be at NMRSD in the ILC or in Room 15, the Computer Room. Dates: June (24 and25) 13 hours, July 23, 6.5 hours, August 20, 6.5 hours plus January 24 (K-8 only) 6.5 hours, February (10, 11) early release days (HS only) 6 hours, February 28 3 hours
Instructors: Dr. Deborah Brady, Barbara Shaw, and Beth Lewandowski
Telephone: 978 597 8713
e-mail: dbrady@nmiddlesex.mec.edu; bshaw@nmiddlesex.mec.edu; blewand@nmiddlesex.mec.edu
FAX: 978-597-0350


COURSE DESCRIPTION: Twenty-first Century Skills include communication, critical thinking, collaboration (teamwork), agility and adaptability, initiative, accessing and analyzing information, and curiosity and imagination. This course will require all of these skills of the participants and, and, in addition to this experience in 21st Century learning, the course will move each teacher forward in a desired area of inquiry in pedagogy and content of English Language Arts. This problem-based learning course is based upon two major ideas: 1) the intrinsic motivation from creating an authentic problem based in a teacher’s need and interests and 2) the increased learning from working collaboratively as a team toward a shared goal. This course makes both teams and individuals accountable for the final products. The general problem is What do you want to know and be able to do better as a 21st century teacher. To answer individual questions, teachers will then coalesce as theme-based teams and collaboratively and individually research, organize, and present their findings to the entire class. This course will be a “blended course,” with both face-to-face classes and workshops and with on-line meetings.



Milestones
Major Components

Due Dates
Milestone I:
Refine your original proposal based on first and second class information
· Topic or theme
· Technology that you may integrate and how(2)
· Research on best practices and topic (3)
· Expert/Interview (1)
· Individual topic goals
· Collaborative presentation goals
· Understanding by Design: Course Description
June 30
Milestone II:
Begin research and begin annotated bibliography.
Begin to use proposed technology.
Fill out Stage I of UbD

· Topic or theme (may be further defined, refined)
· Annotated bibliography of initial research print
· Annotated bibliography of initial on-line resources
· Plan for technology integration
· Collaborative presentation outline
· UbD: Stage I Drafted
July 25
Milestone III:
Research finalized and technology ready to begin
· Topic or theme (may be further defined, refined)
· Annotated bibliography of all resources: print, on line, and expert “interview”
· Technology integration description
· UbD: Stage II (Project/Problem Based assessment, rubric, and authenticity)
August 20
Milestone IV:
Assessment
· Plan assessment and rubric (Stage II UbD) Refine Stage I
October 15
Milestone V:
Group Presentation

· What did you learn/solve/resolve as a group that you want to share with your colleagues?
· Reflect on collaborative process
January 20 K-8
February 10-11 (HS)

Final projects due
· Three stages of UbD completed along with 6 facets, WHERETO, and GRASPS
· Reflection on process: individual and group
Final Individual Projects
UbD finished
GRASPS, WHERETO and reflection and portfolios, etc., sent to central office



TEXTS:
· Texts will vary based on content. At least one of the following (or equivalent) will be required depending upon the theme.
o Kelly Gallagher’s Readicide: How Schools Are Killing Reading and What You Can Do About It. Stenhouse Publishing, 2009.
o Jim Burke’s The English Teacher’s Companion, The Teacher’s Daybook, Tools for Thought, Reading Reminders, Writing Reminders, The Reader’s Handbook from Heineman.
o Teaching Shakespeare Institute: Shakespeare Set Free: An Innivative, Performance-Based Approach to Teaching Shakespeare.
· Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, Understanding by Design, the expanded
2nd Edition: ASCD 2005.

· Web 2.0 tools will also be a part of this course including the Google Apps supported by the school district, wikispaces, Moodle, google.docs, ning.com, social networks including www.englishcompanion.ning.com, www.shakespeareinbits.com, www.xtranormal.com, www.glogster.com, project management software, as well as web sites and technology connected with the English curriculum texts.

LEARNING OUTCOMES/OBJECTIVES
This course will address the four dispositions of the FSC Conceptual Framework of the Educator as Reflective Leader: Knowledgeable, Skill, Caring, and Ethics

Knowledge: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become more cognizant of:
· Pedagogy: Problem-based teaching and its standards
§ Authenticity
§ Academic Rigor
§ Adult/Expert connections
§ Applied learning
§ Active Exploration
§ Evaluation/Critical Thinking
§ Assessment as Ongoing Feedback
§ Reflection
§ Collaboration/Working with a Team
· Content: Each teacher will select an area of inquiry that may include general ELA content: reading, writing, speaking/listening, presentation, research or a more focused area such as teaching a specific genre, developing MCAS/test-taking courses, teaching Shakespeare, or revising a present unit or course to incorporate brain-based techniques or technology or 21st Century skills in a specific course or unit.
· Incorporation of Web 2.0 and Technology into the ELA classroom. As part of the course each teacher will use the course wiki and will organize and present materials on the class wiki. In addition, Google.docs and Google Apps will be used to support collaboration.

Skill: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become better able to:
· Apply 21st Century skills in the ELA classroom
· Use problem-based, authentic learning in the classroom
· Use Web 2.0 tools to support your teaching
Caring: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become more competent in your ability to:
· Adapt classroom experiences to support the need of 21st Century learners
· Differentiate expectations to student interests through problem –based learning
· Connect learning to student’s lives through authentic problems
Ethical: As a result of the learning experiences in the course, you will become better able to:
· Support the ethical use of social networking tools on the Internet

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
The course will include:

· Lecture and presentations by the instructors and other guest lecturers (in webinars and face-to-face) in Web 2.0 and social networking, UbD, problem-based learning, and final presentations by all participants.
· Discussion/Questioning throughout the introduction, on line, and through the final presentations.
· Problem solving by teachers as they research their self-selected areas of English Language arts, as they respond to on-line questions, develop a final collaborative presentation to the class and develop an individual presentation, and reflect on their learning
· Discovery as participants research as teams and as individuals
· Reflective response will be required of participants as part of the final project.
· Viewing or Listening to Others Followed by Discussion during the final presentations.
· Technology will include the class wiki, google.docs, Google Apps, and the English Companion ning http://englishcompanion.ning.com/. Final presentations will be organized on the class wiki and participants will select the final form of the presentation.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Because the course’s experiences will take place during presentations and on line, attendance at each class is essential. In addition, the participants’ responses to and reflections their own and others’ presentation are a central part of the learning in the course. Thus, attendance is mandatory and all missed classes or assignments will have to be made up to receive credit.
· Each teacher must research an area and present the research in teaching English Language Arts both as an individual and as a member of a group. Topics under consideration include: The National Writing Project, teaching poetry, 6-Trait Writing instruction, Write-Smart Writing Instruction, Content Area Literacy, Technology Integration in the ELA Classroom, Wildly Different MCAS Instruction (Bridges Program), Thesis Statement Development, Intervention Program for Low Performing Students (MCAS, technology), On Demand Writing (connection to 6-Traits), Competitive Writing (writing for applications/publication), District Literary Magazine (pK-12), District-Wide Project, Teaching Drama, Literacy Centers, Literacy Circles, Writer’s Workshop.
· Participants will develop a research plan that includes both pedagogy and content and will develop an annotated bibliography of their resources as one of their milestones and for their final project.
· Contributions to wiki discussions on their and others’ themes.
· Last day of class: Brief presentations of their group/individual research and final individual paper/unit/revision of course or unit.
· The final exam includes the presentation to the class and the individual final paper/course/unit.
· The instructor’s policy on work handed in late, makeup examinations: All work must be made up within two weeks to receive credit.
· Cellular Telephones: Kindly turnoff cellular telephones during class time.. For emergency messages please set the telephone device to vibrate. Thank you in advance for your consideration of colleagues and children.
· Expectations of all students: Each student is responsible for completing all course requirements and for keeping up with all activities of the course whether a student is present or not.

EVALUATION OR GRADING POLICY
Grades will be based upon active participation in the class and the wiki, their three-ring binder that includes their writing and research, and upon the quality of the final unit.
10% Participation in class and in group
30% 5 Milestones
20% Final group presentation to class
30% Individual 21st Century Unit including annotated bibliography of readings and internet web sites.
10% Reflection on project and results



COURSE CONTENT/TOPICAL OUTLINE


Hours
37.5 required
Date/Time/
Location
CLASS CONTENT/TOPIC
Milestones
Due Dates
6.5
June 24
8:00-3:00
Room 15 (computer lab) and ILC
Days 1 and 2: Course Overview, plan, begin projects
· Registering for graduate credit
· August date—What works?
· Tomorrow’s class—optional
· Syllabus
· Class wiki
· Education: Our pasts or their futures?
· Problem based learning
· Professional Learning Network
· Understanding by Design
· Collaboration
· Technology Integration
o Google Apps
o Web 2.0
· Time to work as individual and as a team
Milestone I
· Topic or theme
· Technology that you may integrate and how(2)
· Research on best practices and topic (3)
· Expert/Interview (1)
· Individual topic goals
· Collaborative presentation goals
· Understanding by Design: Course Description
Milestone II
· Topic or theme (may be further defined, refined)
· Annotated bibliography of initial research print
· Annotated bibliography of initial on-line resources
· Plan for technology integration
· Collaborative presentation outline
· UbD: Stage I Drafted
Milestone 1: Due July 2.

Milestone 2: Due July 23
6.5
June 25
8:00-3:00
6.5
July 23 Room 115 (computer lab)
· Classroom presentations as individuals and as groups of progress using individual pages on class wiki
· Meetings of groups to continue to plan for Milestone III
Milestone III
· Topic or theme (may be further defined, refined)
· Annotated bibliography of all resources: print, on line, and expert “interview”
· Technology integration description
· UbD: Stage II (Project/Problem Based assessment, rubric, and authenticity
Milestone II due
Milestone III due August 20
6
August 20
(computer lab)
· Classroom presentations as groups on progress of project and next steps of implementation.
· Discuss project-based authentic assessment: GRASPS
· Time to work on UbD and collaborative projects: New Software Implementation
Milestone IV
· Develop assessment and rubric of course using UbD template: Stage II
Milestone IV due October3
3
October
Assessing quality curricula:
· Understanding
· Engagement
· What is a good authentic assessment?
· 6-Facets, WHERETO, GRASPS
Milestone V
· Group presentation
· What did you learn/solve/resolve as a group that you want to share with your colleagues?
· Reflect on collaborative process
Milestone V due
(K-8)January 24
(HS)February 10/11

6
January 24 (K-8)
February 10,11 (HS only)
Final presentations as teams/themes
Milestone VI

· Three stages of UbD completed along with 6 facets, WHERETO, and GRASPS
· Reflection on process: individual and group
Milestone VI Final individual project due March 3
3
March 3
Individual reflections/projects due

Final project due



Assessment Rubric for Final Grade
Advanced:
The participant has insightfully, accurately, and fully researched and applied the principles of 21st Century pedagogy, the UbD backwards design process, and technology integration into their individual and collaborative project. These concepts were communicated clearly in an engaging manner in the final collaborative presentation and in the final individual project.

Pedagogical Best Practice Research: The participant formulated a compelling question and developed a plan for inquiry that fully detailed in an annotated bibliography the expert, print and on-line resources used to formulate research-based best practices to bring to a new or modified course or unit.
Understanding by Design: The participant carefully, thoroughly, and insightfully used the three stages of backwards design process to develop a high quality, standards based unit for students and used the stage four strategies to assess fully the quality of the unit and insightfully reflected on the process. The assessment task was highly relevant and provided the student choices, in which students applied many skills and content and used HOTS to accomplish the task.
Twenty-First Century Skills: The participant actively participated in a problem-based course and developed and implemented an original plan to bring these skills into their classroom.

Proficient:
Major concepts: The participant has adequately researched and applied the principles of 21st Century pedagogy, the UbD backwards design process, and technology integration into their individual and collaborative project. These concepts were communicated adequately in the final collaborative presentation and in the final individual project.

Pedagogical Best Practice Research: The participant formulated a good question and developed a plan for inquiry that provided and documented to a degree the expert, print and on-line resources used to formulate research-based best practices to bring to a new or modified course or unit.
Understanding by Design: The participant adequately used the three stages of backwards design process to develop a good standards based unit for students and generally adequately used the stage four strategies to assess the quality of the unit and insightfully reflected on the process. The assessment task was relevant and provided the student some limited choices, in which students applied some skills and content and to a degree needed to use HOTS to accomplish the task.
Twenty-First Century Skills: The participant participated adequately in a problem-based course and developed and implemented a plan to bring these skills into their classroom.

Not Yet: (Your work will be returned to you and you may improve it if you choose.)
Some inaccuracies are present in the application of the principles of
the course in the presentation, the final project, the UbD unit, the research, and/or in the 21st century skills. The work shows that the participant does do not clearly or totally understand all of the principles of the course. NOTE: The areas of concern will be described to the participant and only those areas will need to be changed to receive a Proficient or Advanced as a final grade when they meet the standards.

Major Milestones
Milestone I: The Full Proposal due
o Milestone 1 Template filled out with questions and concerns
o Research Resources (print/on-line and print/data base)(1 book, 2 articles)
(These resources will be briefly summarized in an annotated bibliography.)
o Technology Resources (3 sites)
(These resources will be briefly summarized for an annotated bibliography.)
o Technology Integration in project (2 minimum)
o UbD Stage I template answer questions 1-5
o Collaborative presentation goals
Milestone II: Preliminary research; preliminary problem/theme developed
o Milestone 2 checklist filled out with questions/concerns
o Problem/theme more clearly defined in UbD document
o UbD Stage I Results: questions 1-9 drafted
o Annotated bibliography of initial research for expert and print
o Annotated bibliography of initial on-line resources
o Plan for technology integration
o Collaborative presentation outline
Milestone III: Finished research and goals for course; Assessment drafted
o Annotated bibliography of all resources: print, on line, and expert “interview”
o Technology integration plan is complete
o Results: UbD Stage I questions 1-9 completed, refined
o Assessment: UbD Stage II questions 1-5 plus rubric drafted
Milestone IV:
o UbD Stage III Sequence of Activities drafted
Milestone V: Team Presentation (HS only)
o Collaborative Project checklist
o What did you understand/solve/resolve as a group? As individuals?
o Reflect on why collaborative learning is both a challenge and a positive incentive.
Milestone V: Team Presentation (K-8 only)
o Collaborative project checklist
o What did you understand/solve/resolve as a group? As individuals?
o Reflect on why collaborative learning is both a challenge and a positive
Final Projects: Curriculum unit and reflection.
o Final Project Checklist
o UbD Stages I-IV completed
o Reflection on process as individual and as group

o Final Project Qualities (based on 21st Century Skills and Problem-Based Learning criteria)
· Authenticity
· Academic Rigor
· Expert Connections
· Applied Learning
· Active Exploration
· Evaluation
· Assessment as Ongoing Feedback
· Reflection

FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE, CPS AND EDUCATION UNIT POLICIES
Attendance and Participation
1. As an graduate student, you are expected to attend every class session, to be on time, and to
communicate with the instructor regarding any absences. Absences and tardiness may result in a permanent grade change.
2. Participation in class discussions and cooperative groups is expected. All graduate students are responsible for meeting required deadlines on projects and assignments; your ability to complete tasks in a timely fashion demonstrates professional maturity and an ability to organize and manage time. Completion of assigned reading is imperative to your individual development as a professional.
3. All of these behaviors regarding attendance, preparation, and meeting deadlines are critical for successful teaching and thus are factored into the final grade.


Cellular Telephones
Kindly turnoff cellular telephones during class time. For emergency messages please set the telephone device to vibrate. Thank you in advance for your consideration of colleagues and children.

Policy on Honesty
The faculty in the Education Unit at Fitchburg State College that work submitted in fulfillment of courserequirements will be solely that of the individual graduate student and all other sources will be cited appropriately. College Academic Dishonesty Policy, as outlined in the College Catalogue, will be strictly adhered to.

Copyright Policy
You are reminded that, in preparing handouts for peers or the instructor, reproduction of copyrighted material without permission of the copyright owner is illegal. Such unauthorized copying may violate the rights of the author or publisher. Fitchburg State College adheres to federal laws regarding use of copyrighted materials. See the Student Handbook for more details.

Fitchburg State College Library and ID Card Information for CPS Students
The GallucciCirio Library at Fitchburg State College provides a full range of library services including borrowing privileges, document delivery (books and articles), Interlibrary Loans, online and toll free phone reference assistance, access to subscription databases, and more. Any questions relating to library services and resources should be directed to the Access Services Librarian at 9786653062 or (toll free within New England) 18883398949 or DLLIBRARY@FSC.EDU. There is also a special section for Distributed Learning Library Services at http://fsc.edu/library/distributed/index.cfm outlining the wide range of services available to you and how to access them. If you need research assistance, contact the
Access Services Librarian or one of our Reference Librarians through our “Ask a Librarian” at

http://fsc.edu/library/ask/index.cfm. Students who are currently registered with the college may access any of the library’s subscription databases, including an increasing number with full text, by visiting the Gallucci Cirio Library’s homepage at http://www.fsc.edu/library, clicking on the link for “All Research Databases” or “Research Guides for Majors”, and selecting the database they want. If you are off campus, you will be prompted to enter your Falcon Key user ID and password. Your Falcon Key gets you access to the library’s databases, your email account and the Blackboard courseware if your class is online. If you have not received your Falcon Key or it does not work, contact the Information Technology Department at 9786654500.
All registered Fitchburg State College students are eligible for a library account; activate it online at http://www.fsc.edu/librarycf/cardrequest.cfm or in person at the Circulation Desk. Your Fitchburg State One Card also serves as your library card. (To obtain your One Card you must present course registration confirmation at Media Services room 229 in the Conlon Industrial Arts Building of the main campus; please call 9786653039
for available times. Anyone taking classes online or at an extended campus location may request a photoless One Card online at
http://www.fsc.edu/onecard/photoless/index.cfm which will be mailed to them.) After activation by the Gallucci Cirio Library, students may use any Massachusetts State College and University Library during the current semester. Your Banner number is your library barcode. Students are also eligible for a Fitchburg State College email account. Please contact the IUser Services department in room 230 of the Conlon Industrial Arts Building of the main campus or call 9786654500